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Debbie Hancock

Debbie Hancock

Owner of Southbourne Accountancy & Business Services

Four Examples of Companies That Take Social Responsibility as Seriously as Corporate Responsibility

Being socially responsible doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice profit. Today, it’s more important than ever to treat corporate and social responsibility equally.

What makes a company socially responsible in today’s economy? Looking at ways to reduce waste, give back, and become more environmentally-friendly are just a few examples.

With increased consumer pressure, more and more companies now take on social responsibilities. These companies in particular have taken their efforts to give back to new levels.

Google

The tech giant has a serious investment in checking its business through a social impact lens. In fact, the company offers paid time off so that its employees can volunteer for various causes.

Google is also the world’s leading buyer of renewable energy. Not to mention it offers many grants to social impact initiatives such as Equal Justice and Goodwill Industries International, among others.

Whether in making an effort to provide a green community or fighting social injustice, Google has its fingers in many pies. The company may be all about tech development with its R&D budget, but it also has a strong social impact that keeps its customers pleased.

LEGO

The famous toymaker does a lot more than the world thinks. 

With the creation of the LEGO Sustainable Material Centre, it allowed the toymaker to work on developing sustainable alternatives for packaging and materials.

It’s one of the newest companies to commit to ethical business practices and social responsibilities. LEGO proved that it’s never too late to take on an important cause, which also helped the company gain new loyal followers.

Levi Strauss

The legendary clothing brand has been on the market since 1873. But the company struggled for years with its impact on water use and the environment.

New company policies focused on reducing the amount of water used in jean production. And since the implementation of the initiative in 2011, Levi Strauss has saved over one billion litres.

The company also took on additional causes, like supporting people with HIV/AIDS, donating clothes, and further reducing its contribution to climate change.

What’s truly impressive is that one of the oldest companies in a traditional industry like Levi Strauss actually managed to see the importance of change. Its new socially-responsible culture helped shine a fresh and bright light on the brand.

Microsoft

Microsoft already changed the world once – its early involvement and advancements in tech made most of what we have today possible.

But it didn’t stop there.

Once the wealthiest person in the world, founder Bill Gates has long devoted much of his time and fortune to philanthropy. That’s why Microsoft has been involved in charities, nonprofits, and various social causes since 1983.

Like Google, Microsoft also has a program that allows employees to take paid time off when volunteering for their favourite causes.

You Can Start Small

No one expects a small business to have a social impact that rivals that of Fortune 500 companies. But even some of the oldest top players started their philanthropy ventures on a more modest scale.

 

The most important thing is to start early and plant the seed of social responsibility in the company culture. As time goes on, it can grow into a more significant trait of the company.

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